Marvin Brunch

Marvin and I had a sordid love affair. First, there was the “Ooh, look at this lovely rooftop patio with a bar! Let’s play here every Saturday night!” phase. I would squeeze in with all the other sticky bodies, drinking the Belgian suds and ruining far too many pairs of heels in the cracks of the wooden patio deck.

Then I got sick of the rooftop, plus someone decided it was a good idea to build up that open-yet-wonderfully-graffitied lot next door, sealing off an entire side of the patio. So, alas, Marvin and I moved into the second phase of our love affair: dinner.

Photo credit: Becca Clara Love

Photo credit: Becca Clara Love

And so I spent Friday and Saturday nights in the dark, crowded restaurant downstairs, sipping wine with friends and people-watching out the steamy windows while waiting for a table. After a four- or five-hour wait-plus-dinner under the gaze of Mr. Marvin Gaye, full on amazing wine and amazing Soul food, I would decide, yes, that was entirely worth the wait.

But now … now I think we’re moving into the final stage of our affair. And that would be brunch. Let’s Get it On …

Photo credit: Tammy Portnoy

Photo credit: Tammy Portnoy

Before I dive into the lovey-dovey, I must make a confession. Marvin is owned by Eric Hilton (and his partners), and Eric is one-half of Thievery Corporation. And, if you know me at all, you know that in my eyes, Mr. Hilton (and his co-Thieve Rob) can do no wrong. So, yes, this review might be a little biased.

If you can’t tell from Thievery’s music, Hilton is inspired by a lot of different musicians. Marvin Gaye being one of his favorites, he opened the restaurant in Gaye’s name, creating an atmosphere that married D.C. soul with Belgian café. Why the strange combination? Here’s a bit of D.C. history for you: Marvin Gaye grew up in Washington, D.C., and even dropped out of Cardozo High School right up the street from the restaurant. Later in his life, he spent two years in self-imposed exile in the Belgian town of Ostend. Hence the D.C.-Belgian thing.

But how do you combine Belgian specialties with American Southern food? Simple. Executive chef James Claudio did it by plunking fried chicken on a Belgian waffle. The rest is history.

Photo credit: Tammy Portnoy

Photo credit: Tammy Portnoy

Brunch at Marvin is seriously trendy. It’s full of beautiful people—I’m talking young parents who look like they could moonlight as Urban Outfitter models—in fedoras and sunglasses. The lighting is perfect for a hangover. You can slip into a dark booth and still enjoy your tablemates and the food. There were five of us ladies at brunch on Sunday, and I was severely hung over (read: still a little drunk), so I did the daring thing and just went for it … Country fried chicken on a Belgian waffle for me!

The chicken (Marvin’s specialty dish) was crispy and not greasy. Grease is usually the staple of fried chicken, but not in this version. And the waffle was toasted to perfection and not soggy from the chicken perched on it. It really is a perfect mix, only made better by the sweet syrup that balances the savory chicken. It’s funny because, even though we tried lots of the other entrees, my co-brunchers all went for my fried chicken. It was Just. So. Good.

The crab cakes were my second favorite. Two cakes (a little on the salty side, and not just sea salt unfortunately), perfectly poached eggs, and a rich Bearnaise sauce on an English muffin. It was a nice departure from the usual slabs of ham. They were heavy but delicious.

Photo credit: Tammy Portnoy

Photo credit: Tammy Portnoy

What else did we enjoy? The Croque Madame was an overachieving ham and cheese sandwich: smoked ham, fried egg, béchamel, and gruytere cheese. And the huevos rancheros were tasty and made with homemade tortillas, poached eggs, guacamole, chipotle, and queso blanco. The best part is that the food is not just filling, it’s inexpensive. Everything on the menu is around 10 bucks.

An affair to remember? Can I Get a Witness? What’s Going On? Can I drop any more embarrassingly cheesy Marvin Gaye references? Alas, I think I’m in love.

The Bitches say: A; a DC gem, good food (go for the chicken!), great brunch atmosphere, inexpensive.

Marvin
2007 14th Street Northwest
Washington, DC 20009-7562
(202) 797-7171

Marvin on Urbanspoon

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Comments

  • Chocolate Diva (CD) says:

    I love Marvin’s and was not aware that they served brunch! My only concern is that your report was missing two of my most important brunch requirements: Grits and Unlimited Mimosas! HA! I am a huge fan of Marvin’s grits and scallops. It’s honestly the only thing I get everytime I go. I do know that the chicken and waffles are amazing per my friends, but it’s just “not my thing”. Give me grits with anything…and I will be your new best friend. At least until the end of the meal….:)

  • [...] My favorite band played at Kastles Stadium at the Wharf a few weeks ago, and afterwards a group of us staggered from the tennis court down the street to Station 4 for some late-night grub. We didn’t realize what a swanky place it was until we piled into our red patent leather booth and started knocking over all the glassware on the table. [...]

  • [...] waffle was fluffy and light, even later. And the open-faced fried chicken—though it’s no Marvin chicken and waffles—hit the spot. It was like a couple of chicken tenders, but with lots of spices and [...]

  • [...] But the Brixton is also the newest venture from the Hilton brothers—the duo who also own Marvin, Blackbyrd, Patty Boom Boom, ESL, and other wildly popular D.C. haunts. So, that fact instantly raises the level of expectation for the quality of the food. Marvin was one of my favorite brunches a few years ago and somewhere both Bitches regularly dine. [...]

  • [...] Street is mostly back-to-back with great Ethiopian spots, trendy new steakhouses and wine bars, and Thievery Corp-owned bars and lounges. A narrow little Italian joint just seems, well, a bit out of place. Plus its deep red walls are [...]

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